Security and Privacy on the U3 Platform

Be Smart with U3

Microsoft’s Smart Card Strategy

A smart card is essentially a simple plastic card, like a credit card, that is fabricated with a computer chip capable of storing information and supporting cryptographic operations to secure the data access.
These cards find a lot of consumer and industrial uses because they can store data and, more importantly, can act on that data. Smart cards were first adopted in Europe, and gained quick popularity soon after their introduction.
It appeared this market never took off in the United States, but the new security wave that started taking shape soon after the release of the Microsoft Windows 95 gave the smart card and the embedded industry a new direction.
In the mid-90’s. Microsoft Corporation endorsed development in the field of smart cards. The smart card industry looked to be the next big thing and today it is! Let’s take a look at the events and developments in this smart stream, both as a technology savvy developer and as anaive user of it. Did you know that the SIM in your mobile phone is a smart card?
As a part of its smart card strategy, Microsoft announced Smart Card Base Components for Windows 95 for integrating Smart Cards and Personal Computers in the last quarter of 1996.These components were also provided as a separate install on the Windows 98 CD ROM and Windows 2000 contains these components inbox (bundled with the installer).
These components included a set of DLL’s and COM servers that exposed either raw APIs to access Smart cards attached to a PC or a high level interface to them. SCardSvr.exe is one such COM server that runs as a service on Win2000. On Windows 2000 and higher versions of the OS, these components support public key services such as secure logon.
thats for today,
read up more in the next post!!!
-The Editor (editor@onsmartcards.com)
http://www.onsmartcards.com/
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October 30, 2006 - Posted by | Uncategorized

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